online streaming

Why Netflix Is Still #Winning

Recently Netflix announced its third Quarter financials and the headlines since have not been kind. Over the past three months the darling of the post-Blockbuster era has been criticized for their July price increases and accused of ignoring customer loyalty. And let’s not forget the collective facepalm heard ’round the world when Qwikster was announced… Now, another wave of criticism is sweeping through Los Gatos as Netflix’ stock price continues

July Movie Category Shows Strong Online Interest

BOSTON, MA–(Marketwire – Aug 30, 2011) – Kantar Media Compete today released July data showing growth in its Movie category, which totaled 61.2 million unique visitors (UVs) — an increase of 6.9 percent month-over-month (M-O-M) and 7.8 percent year-over-year (Y-O-Y). With studios counting on summer blockbusters to lure consumers into the theaters, many movie-related sites, including portals, movie sites, studio sites and theater sites, received a boost in July. This corresponds

Invite Only: Who’s Throwing the Better Party – Google+, Spotify, or Pottermore?

I remember when I thought I was special for being able to use Gilt, the “exclusive” online shopping site that originally only accepted users off of a waiting list. Now, everyone and their mother is on it and I no longer feel like I am the only one with access to 50% off boat shoes or 75% off a chandelier that I couldn’t even afford if it was 99.9% off.

Is Netflix Penny-wise or Pound Crazy?

Last week Netflix notified me that my current service (one DVD and unlimited streaming) would go from about $10 to $16 (8 bucks for streaming and 8 bucks for DVD’s).  That’s a 60% percent increase with absolutely no added value for the money.  At first, I found this shocking and was outraged at having to buy Netflix a large latte (and a low fat muffin) every month for nothing in

America Loves TV

Even with increasing options online, on tablets, and elsewhere, the average person still watched 34 hours of broadcast network and basic cable TV per week in 2010, up by about 1 percent from 2009.  You could watch both seasons of Glee in their entirety in that amount of time! (Well… without including all of the commercials, that is – ah, the beauty of TiVo.) While we don’t track whether people