branding

Putting the ‘Star’ in Starbucks: Getting Digital Right

Coffee: the drug of choice for busy professionals, sleep-deprived college students, Twitter bio writers, and me. The caffeinated landscape is filled with brands, brews, and beans — but it’s safe to say that nobody has quite the stronghold over the cafe market than Starbucks. How does Starbucks get digital right? Let’s take a look.

The Weekly Compete Pulse

Here’s a round up of our favorite digital marketing stories from the web this week: 10 Google Analytics Advanced Segments That Reveal Search & Social ROI, How & When You Can Turn SEM From A Checkbox To A Core Business Component, How To Get Interactive Branding Right, The Most Effective Tactics for Acquiring Facebook Fans and Twitter Followers

The Unbearable Lightness Of Branding

Direct response campaigns bring in new customers, move the inventory and are held accountable to hard business KPIs. Branding is about creating awareness, perceptions and attitudes. Direct response results are evident from campaign data itself.

The Weekly Compete Pulse

Here’s a round up of our favorite digital marketing stories from the web this week: the most valuable commodity in online marketing, content marketing tools, purpose-driven marketing, and a new website checklist.

What Can Vine Do For You?

Image from: Vine / Tech Cocktail We’ve been following (and playing around with) Vine’s new six-second video app these last few days, and thinking about what Vine means to you as digital and social marketers. Here goes: Early struggles, quick recovery. The first edition of the Vine App came with its fair share of struggles. Some videos didn’t get uploaded, log-in credentials were swapped with other users, and there was

Should Livestrong sever ties with the Lance Armstrong brand?

Image from: elcerebrohabla Does the Livestrong Foundation need to further re-brand themselves in the wake of Lance Armstrong’s confession to using performance enhancing drugs? Trust is a necessary component of building a strong brand, and the scandal has tarnished it. Non-profits do not have a product, only a compelling mission which must bring in donations. The Livestrong Foundation has made critical strives to protect their brand. First, it has expanded

The Weekly Compete Pulse

Marketing is about standing out. Sometimes. Mostly it’s about translating a message across a medium in a promotional fashion, but what happens when marketing gets in its own way? This is often the case in brand extensions, where quixotic gimmicks like Cheetos Lipgloss are created to draw attention back to a brand but actually cause a consumer to simply shudder. AdAge’s John Parham recently put out a guide to extending

Will LevelUp Level Up?

Image from: John D. Sutter / CNN If you see a man walking around Boston with bright orange sunglasses and an orange shirt, it’s either an aberrant competitive cyclist or Seth Priebatsch, Princeton dropout, unabashed genius, and founder of SCVNGR and LevelUp. (Other tech superstars were also known for their styling, or rather their nearly aggressive indifference to style;  Steve Jobs was beyond loyal to that black mock turtleneck, and

Overstock vs. O

Mashable recently published a piece on how O.com (formerly Overstock.com) was changing its name back to Overstock.com.  Good move in my opinion – just looking at traffic to both web addresses, it is easy to see that the kind-of-cool-but-a-bit-strange URL www.o.com wasn’t getting the attention of consumers. For review, here’s Overstock.com’s traffic over the past two years: As you can see, the chart has been relatively stable during the past

Digital CMO Series: John Bell, Managing Director, Oglivy 360

“Even Social Media needs brand management.” At the 2011 Digital CMO Summit, John Bell, Managing Director at Ogilvy 360 shared his thought provoking presentation – Overcoming the CMO’s Dilemma. John discussed a number of key questions and challenges that CMO’s are facing as brands begin to move from “experimentation into operationalizing” social media.  It’s not as simple as senior marketing executives finally “getting it.” CMOs and their immediate teams are

Gender Marketing: Pinkberry is for Girls, Ben & Jerry’s is for Boys

I don’t think I’m alone in stereotyping the entire American female population as a group of ice cream addicts. For years, the go-to post-break up image has been a woman sitting on her couch with a bowl of ice cream watching a romance movie. I would imagine that ice cream companies have a fairly easy time tapping into the female market. But the question is: Are they consciously working to