Barack Obama

The Compete Weekly Pulse

On Tuesday, November 6th, Barack Obama was re-elected as the President of the United States of America. If you’re reading this right now, chances are you already know this. For all us marketers and digital-denizens, the election comes with a double dose of insights into campaigning, behaviors, and political culture both offline and online. For instance, how did people prep for the polls? What was the online scene like in the

Online Behavior: How People Prepped for the Polls

Image from: Ballot Box / Shutterstock   Just in case you didn’t know, the election is over. It’s been resolved. There’s bound to be a wealth of analysis about the results in the coming days, but I’d like to take a moment to do an analysis that preempts the results. I want to look at online behavior just before polling day.  Below is a snapshot of various political-centric online properties

Binders and Bayonets: A Study in Virality

Image from: Lisa Frank Binders / LisaFrank.com By now we’re all familiar with Romney’s phrase “binders full of women,” which went viral mere hours after it was said in the second Presidential debate. The reaction was instantaneous online, trending on Twitter and even spawning its own Tumblr. Politics aside, the data around the phrase gives a rare snapshot into the process of virality, notably who benefits from the search traffic

The Compete Weekly Pulse

September data is now LIVE at Compete! Check out the top growing sites for September in our announcement post. Pinterest impacts buyers. We know this, and we’ve proven it ourselves. In our study we found that 14% of Pinterest visitors shopped on eBay during the same session after engaging with Pinterest. That’s pretty fundamental evidence that Pinterest is folding itself into the path to purchase paradigm of ecommerce shoppers. What

Obama vs. Romney: Who’s Supporting Who?

Image from: Political Debate / Shutterstock If you were like me last Wednesday night, you might have found yourself sitting on the couch with a few friends or family members and tuning into the first Presidential debate of the 2012 election. If so, you also likely picked up on a major theme running throughout Jim Lehrer’s (the moderator) questions. Contrast. Last week Compete published an infographic on how the two

Digital Duel 2012: Obama vs. Romney

With the start of the presidential debates only days away, both the Obama and Romney camps are simply buzzing with social media momentum. To put into perspective the online presence of either candidate, we’ve created the following infographic to demonstrate which candidate is getting the most traffic, who that traffic is coming from, and what it could mean for this year’s Presidential Election. Just check out that map! State-by-state Obama’s campaign site is attracting

Racy Racy Reddit: Not Even a Little Safe For Work

Image from: Aghast Lady / Shutterstock The fame. The infamy. The Reddit. Recently Obama joined the noted list of Reddit ‘Ask Me Anything’ hosts, but perhaps the site isn’t the most…appropriate venue for a candidate vying for reelection. According to Wikipedia, Reddit.com is a “social news website where the registered users submit content.” Posts can be voted “up” and “down” by users, creating the hierarchical ranking of posts on the

#AskObama 3 Reasons Why He Takes Advantage of Social Media

Last Wednesday, thousands of Twitter users opened their respective browsers and clicked into President Obama’s virtual Town Hall. Using the hash tag #AskObama and tweeting @townhall, Obama’s event garnered over 70,000 questions in the form of 140 character tweets (See: how to make really complicated political issues concise). Obama has been using Social Media as an outlet to reach the public ever since the beginning of his campaign. Through an

2012: Your Votes Will Be ‘Liked’ And ‘Retweeted’

It’s that time again, time for hopeful potential presidential nominees to start the campaign process for 2012. While it’s still too early to talk about who the frontrunners would be, or make any predictions about the outcome of the election, one thing is already abundantly clear: social media will play an even larger role in this election than ever before. President Obama’s social strategy in 2008 has been cited ad